Teaching the Autistic Child in Mainstream Primary Schools

This is particularly straining for parents, who just want their child to receive the same education and environment as children without autism. As such, the presence of autistic students in mainstream schools often indicates that autistic children aren’t receiving the special care and at

In small children, the presence of autism can make it challenging for parents to find a suitable school for them. Autism is after all a condition that requires extensive and specialized attention. However, this attention can be lacking in mainstream primary schools, usually due to the non-availability of trained staff and facilities. This is particularly straining for parents, who just want their child to receive the same education and environment as children without autism. As such, the presence of autistic students in mainstream schools often indicates that autistic children aren’t receiving the special care and attention that they merit. Autism in itself is an important issue, and is significantly difficult to understand for beginners. Hence, nurses having this subject as a thesis can take the help of reputable Essay Help to better understand and tackle the concept. 

Specialized Planning

This is particularly important as children who are on the autistic spectrum tend to need specialized attention in order to learn effectively. This attention include the use of therapies and predictable environments, where autistic children can feel at ease and allow for absorption of knowledge and education to happen. Specialized teaching programs involve the understanding of sensory problems and impairments, and using the data to compensate for them to make the curriculum fruitful. One example of this is to incorporate visual aids for students who seem to learn better with visual input.

The main issue in teaching autistic children is communication. This barrier often results in mainstream schoolteachers not being able to educate and express themselves to autistic students. As a consequence, autistic children are often alienated from their educational and social gatherings, resulting in development of further mental and behavioral issues. The first step in tackling this issue is to educate the teachers in dealing with autistic students, which could be done as part of a separate training course.

Training teachers for Autism

This does however, raise a different issue. If a course for dealing with autistic children is offered as a tool for the professional development of teachers, should it be optional or mandatory. After all, the teachers are not in charge of selecting their students, and the presence of such an option would just result in student alienation and pressure on the teachers that take it. This dilemma can be resolved by the gradual introduction of workshops into the professional development of teachers and as a result, teachers would learn how to interact with autistic students effectively.

How parents can make a difference

Before enrolling a child on the autistic spectrum into a mainstream school, parents can look for a school which has the facilities and resources to fulfill their child’s needs. Parents can research about mainstream schools located in their vicinity, and personally meet the staff and management in order to confirm whether their children’s issues can be resolved. This may include speech therapies, training and other such services.

The chance to socialize and get together with non-autistic students is also a big factor. Parents can inquire into the mixing of children with autism with children without autism, particularly for extracurricular activities like sports, arts and music. Parents can also reach out to parents of autistic children currently enrolled at a certain school, to better assess the fitness of a school for their children.